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Technology Is Making Us Stupid!

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High-Level Panel on Technology Bank for Least Developed Countries

The 2011 Istanbul Programme of Action called for the establishment of a technology bank and a science, technology and innovation supporting mechanism dedicated to least developed countries, a long-standing priority of the LDCs confirmed in the 2015 Addis Ababa Action Agenda and in Sustainable Development Goal 17. The Panel’s recommendations highlighted that the Technology Bank, modelled on the United Nations University, has the potential to strengthen national capabilities and provide expertise to the world’s least developed countries, ensuring that they are no longer left behind in achieving internationally agreed development goals. 23 March 2017 – After the adoption of the General Assembly resolution on the establishment of the Technology Bank for Least Developed Countries and as mandated by its Charter the Secretary-General has appointed the members of the Council of the Technology Bank for a term ending in 2019. Ms. Heidi Schroderus-Fox, Director of OHRLLS, will serve as acting Managing Director of the Technology Bank during the operationalization phase of the Bank until a Managing Director is recruited and has assumed duties. 22 September 2017 – The Technology Bank, a new body dedicated to the least developed countries was operationalized today, with the signing of the Host Country Agreement and the Contribution Agreement between the Government of Turkey and the United Nations. This marks an important milestone in global efforts to strengthen the science, technology and innovation capacity in the world’s 47 least developed countries. The new Bank is expected to improve the utilization of scientific and technological solutions in the world’s poorest countries and promote the integration of least developed countries into the global knowledge-based economy. The Secretary-General said: “The operationalization today of the Technology Bank for the least developed countries marks a major step forward in assisting the world’s most vulnerable countries to shore up their science, technology and innovation aspirations and potential. This new Bank will help to ensure that we live up to the expectations of the international community to achieve the 2030 Agenda, realize the Sustainable Development Goals and leave no one behind.” “I welcome Turkey’s generous financial support as host of the Technology Bank and I am encouraged by the equally generous pledges from the least developed countries. I urge other Member States and stakeholders including the private sector, academia and foundations to also make voluntary contributions. Collectively, we shall ensure a solid and sustainable financial footing for the Technology Bank,” said Ms. Fekitamoeloa ‘Utoikamanu, High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States. In 2011, the Istanbul Programme of Action for the least developed countries called for the establishment of a technology bank dedicated to least developed countries. “The Technology Bank has tremendous potential to tackle one of the great new divides of our times – access to science, technology and capacity to innovate. It will bring on board and coordinate expertise from the entire UN System to support the world’s poorest countries across the whole spectrum of science, innovation and technology. The full operationalization of the Technology Bank is the first Sustainable Development Goal target to be achieved,” said Ms. Fekitamoeloa Katoa ‘Utoikamanu, Under-Secretary-General, High Representative of the Secretary-General for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States, and the Secretary-General’s representative on the Council. Council members, meeting in New York, agreed that in 2018 the Technology Bank will focus on preparing a number of STI reviews and technology needs assessments in the world’s poorest countries.
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Institute for Security, Technology, and Society

The WiCyS initiative was launched in 2013 with support from a National Science Foundation grant, and with support from various industry, government and academic partners, WiCyS has become a continuing effort to recruit, retain and advance women in cybersecurity. Friday, July 14th was the final day and wrap up of our 2017 ISTS GenCyber Summer High School Cybersecurity Program. V.S. Subrahmanian-whose work in data science and cybersecurity has been used to accurately forecast the behavior of terrorist networks, detect bots on social media platforms, prevent rhinoceros poaching, and much more-has been named the inaugural Dartmouth College Distinguished Professor in Cybersecurity, Technology, and Society, beginning Aug. 1. Dr. Dan Geer, Chief Information Security Officer for In-Q-Tel, recently cited the work done by Professor Sergey Bratus, ISTS Research Scientist, as a harbinger of the work that needs to be done to increase the security and trustworthiness of digital systems. New Book from the Director of the ISTS. The Internet of Risky Things: Trusting Devices That Surround Us. by Professor Sean Smith, Director of the ISTS, has been published recently by O’Reilly and is available from Amazon as well. Developers, engineers, industrial designers, makers, and researchers will explore “Design patterns of insecurities” and learn what’s required to route around or fix them in the nascent IoT. Examine bugs that plague large-scale systems, including integer overflow, race conditions, and memory corruption Look at successful and disastrous examples of previous quantum leaps in health IT, the smart grid, and autonomous vehicles Explore patterns in coding, authentication, and cryptography that led to insecurity Learn how blunders that led to spectacular IT disasters could have been avoided Associate or Full Professorship in Cybersecurity. We seek candidates who will be excellent researchers and teachers in the broad range of areas related to cybersecurity. We particularly seek candidates who will help lead, initiate, and participate in collaborative research projects within Computer Science and beyond, including Dartmouth researchers from other Arts & Sciences departments, Geisel School of Medicine, Thayer School of Engineering, and Tuck School of Business. With interest in cybersecurity at an all-time high, Dartmouth’s Computer Science Department has launched its winter colloquium series spotlighting cybersecurity. Over the course of the winter term, six cybersecurity experts will address topics ranging from the inadequacy of passwords to the difficulty in securing mobile devices. The program aims to meet regional and national needs through a program of mentoring and training in cybersecurity. A video released by Dartmouth provides an overview of the cutting edge research and education and outreach efforts at the Institute for Security, Technology, and Society.
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National Energy Technology Laboratory

NETL-Supported Project Advances Carbon Capture at Texas Hydrogen Production PlantA large-scale project, made
possible through NETL support, is capturing about one million tons of carbon dioxide per year from a state-of-the-art hydrogen production facility in Texas and forging a successful new direction for hydrogen production technology. An innovative computational toolkit developed by the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, in collaboration with a team from other national laboratories, has been recognized by R&D Magazine as one of the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace in the past year. Department of Energy Announces up to $5.5 Million for First Phase of Advanced Turbine Technologies Funding OpportunityThe U.S. Department of Energy has announced up to $5.5 million in federally funded financial assistance for cost-shared research and development projects under the first phase of the Office of Fossil Energy’s funding opportunity announcement Advanced Components for 65% Combined-Cycle Efficiency, SCO2 Power Cycles and Advanced Modular Hybrid Heat Engines. DOE to Invest $8.6 Million in Innovative Technologies to Enhance Fossil Energy Power System Efficiency The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy has selected 12 crosscutting research projects to receive $8.6 million in federal funding. The projects will develop innovative technologies that will enhance the efficiency of fossil energy power systems. University of North Dakota awarded contract to investigate coal-based resources containing REEs – World Coal. NETL’s coal-related projects impact technologies that can revitalize American manufacturing and energy production. Few things are certain in a changing world, but some things we can be sure of-through the year 2030, our electricity consumption will grow by about one percent a year; fossil fuel will remain a major fuel source for the facilities that produce electricity to meet that demand; and NETL’s work developing lower cost carbon capture and storage technologies will help make producing electricity and chemicals more efficient while enhancing the recovery of oil reserves once thought inaccessible. NETL presents the latest edition of a quarterly publication, showcasing the Lab’s many accomplishments and robust areas of research. This issue explores how NETL is advancing technologies for effective resource development and environmental sustainability. NETL welcomed teachers from throughout the southwestern Pennsylvania region to an exciting two-day training event. The teachers participated in hands-on, minds-on experiences of fun, low-cost activities that they could bring back to their own classrooms.
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