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6 reasons why you should be blogging

WHAT’S THIS VIDEO ABOUT? Do you blog for your business? If not, this video explores 6 reasons why you should. I offer my thoughts and insight into the …

Small Business Owner Salaries

Small business owners are the financial and/or executive heads of small business. Their duties can be as simple as serving as the profit-maker of the business and delegating authority to a management team; however, many small business owners are constantly engaged in growing and operating their business. Small business owners must either develop their own plans, or, in other cases, pay a franchise fee and use the franchised name and business model. Small businesses operate in almost every industry, from financial and legal to education and hospitality; due to the wide variety of industries and levels of engagement, the regular working hours and tasks are often determined by the type of business and how its owner chooses to participate in its development. Many small business owners will work a few times a year to solve specific problems related to the business, while others will be fully-engaged during regular business hours and perform executive tasks during non-business hours. A small business owner can always expect to be their own boss. There are no educational or training requirements for small business owners, but having a degree in Business Management, Finance, or a related field is useful for securing investors and, of course, having the know-how to develop and execute a business plan. Small Business Owner Tasks Oversee company operations, directing production, sales, administrative, and/or distribution activities. Oversee and/or assist with personnel management, including hiring, training, and performance evaluation. Oversee and/or assist with client acquisition and marketing strategies. Develop and/or assist with company-wide policies, procedures, objectives, and business strategies. Direct and review financial activities, measuring productivity, setting prices, and/or managing budgets.
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Government-Business Forum on Small Business Capital Formation

The SEC hosts an annual forum that focuses on the capital formation concerns of small business. Called the “SEC Government-Business Forum on Small Business Capital Formation,” this gathering has assembled annually since 1982, as mandated by the Small Business Investment Incentive Act of 1980. A major purpose of the Forum is to provide a platform to highlight perceived unnecessary impediments to small business capital formation and address whether they can be eliminated or reduced. Each forum seeks to develop recommendations for government and private action to improve the environment for small business capital formation, consistent with other public policy goals, including investor protection. Participants in the Forum typically have included small business executives, venture capitalists, government officials, trade association representatives, lawyers, accountants, academics and small business advocates. In recent years, the format of the Forum typically has emphasized small interactive breakout groups developing recommendations for governmental action. The one-day forum will begin at 9 a.m. Central Time and will be open to the public. The 2017 Forum will include a morning panel followed by breakout groups. The panel discussion will explore how capital formation options are working for small businesses, including small businesses in Texas. Information on the panel participants, the full agenda and further details on this year’s Forum will be posted here as they become finalized. Members of the public may attend the Forum in person without charge, but are asked to pre-register online. You also may use the online registration form to let the SEC staff know you are interested in having your name on the mailing list for future Forums.
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Compare Coverage Quotes| Insureon

The Court Statistics Project reports that the median cost of a business liability lawsuit is about $54,000. The good news is that there are several company insurance policies to help manage the risks presented by clients and members of the public. A customer has a slip-and-fall accident on your property: Commercial General Liability Insurance can help pay for immediate medical expenses and lawsuit costs if you’re sued over a non-employee’s bodily injury or property damage. Your client loses money after taking your professional advice: Professional Liability Insurance generally pays for your defense if a client alleges you made mistakes in your work. An employee loses their laptop, exposing your clients’ financial information: Cyber Liability Insurance helps cover the cost of notification, credit monitoring, and other post-breach expenses. Liquor Liability Insurance can help manage those risks. Take a look at our article “General Liability Insurance vs. Professional Liability Insurance” for more clarification. If not, you might want to supplement your protection with Umbrella Insurance. Most states require employers to carry Workers’ Compensation Insurance, which covers employees’ occupational injury expenses. Employment Practices Liability Insurance can cover disputes stemming from the employer-employee relationship. Bonus tip: Nonprofit organizations and others with a board of directors may want Directors and Officers Insurance. D&O Insurance addresses disputes over decisions the board makes on behalf of the organization.
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